RT14. Transdisciplinary approaches to sustainability of mountain social-ecological systems under global change

In preparation for our roundtable, please read the following:

In this roundtable discussion, we will share experiences regarding best practices for effective transdisciplinary research in mountains.  We will ask whether there are similarities/differences in approaches to transdiscliplinary processes among roundtable participants and identify cross-cutting principles for success and /or enduring challenges.

Comment: Know the full range of relevant stakeholders. Community leaders and managers? Lay public?

Participants will discuss the question: What factors facilitate adoption of best practices and what factors pose barriers to successful use of best practices for conducting transdisciplinary research in mountains?

Comment: One of the enduring challenges is the process of building meaningful stakeholder engagement. It is a slow process requiring meaningful interactions and reflection. What has worked: Living in the community, sharing non-science activities. Document what works and what doesn’t (everyday!). Have stakeholders show you their community, their landscapes. 

We will also explore whether different mountain contexts are associated with specific best practices and discuss the reasons for similarity.

Your thoughts?? We look forward to hearing from you.

We will start blogging in earnest tomorrow (Monday). Please stay tuned.

Advertisements

One thought on “RT14. Transdisciplinary approaches to sustainability of mountain social-ecological systems under global change

  1. “Collective identities” and “sameness” of mountain communities facilitate adoption of best practices around the globe . For example: local innovations of the mountain indigenous peoples from one context can be adopted to another as they have common features (due to common livelihood options and strategies, indigenousity, landscape specialty, social ecology and similar development priorities) and these innovations from one region are easily welcomed by the indigenous communities of another region (initially as an alternative strategies for livelihood improvement and, as regular practice once it is adopted for the future).

    On the other hand: state development policies, regional policy instruments, influences and interests of the local political alliances and lack of (or dissimilar) infrastructural facilities etc. pose barriers to successful use of best practices [even though the mountain context is collectively similar in different regions of the world,the state instruments (policy, political scenario and type of government/s) and local political (and developmental) contexts are, of course, different].

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s